My brain damaged dad




This is a long story that I am going to greatly summarize. 

When my dad was a teen he was in a motorcycle accident and suffered brain damage. At first he was still pretty functional once he went through therapy, but was prone to grand mal seizures every few years. Every time he has one of these seizures, his mind gets a little further gone. 

Today he is at a point where he rarely knows where he is and is prone to agitation and violence. After his last seizure, my wife and I found him unconscious and his face was covered in dried blood and vomit. He was put into a hospital where all they would do for him was shoot him full of benzos every time he would act up, which was every day.  Legally, the hospital had to keep him until they found a home for him. Eventually they paid a home a large amount of money to take him off their hands. He has basically been bobbing between homes and hospitals since then because each one has been misrepresenting him to the next. As soon as one place realizes how he is, they pass him off to another home or hospital. 

Here is what really concerns me- he is at a high risk for being put on the street because there doesn't seem to be anything in place for someone like him and assisted living homes can just kick people out.  There really seems to be nothing in the way of help for someone like my dad unless you have lots of money to pay a private home to deal with him. Him coming home with a family member is out of the question. For example, if he were to come live with me, half of my things would be broken in the first week and he probably would try to assault my wife. 

This all breaks my heart. If the current place he is at puts him out on the street, which they legally can do, there will be a serious hazard to not only him but to others. I have no doubt that he would get hit by a car when he wanders into the street or shot when he breaks into someones house. What in the world can be done to help him? He cant be the first person to be in this sort of situation. 

Thanks for your time,
Chris Fry